Trigger Points: What Are They?

Massage Therapy is a very confusing field now. Not being covered under insurance leaves the door wide open to what falls under the heading. A given massage therapist practices anything from spa relaxation to physical therapy type work.

To clarify what I do, the type of massage therapy modality I specialize in is “Neuromuscular Therapy” or “Trigger Point Myotherapy.”

What’s a Trigger Point & Why Work It?

“Trigger points” (TrPs) are tender points in soft tissue that radiate or refer pain to distant areas. These are found all over the human body usually in the belly of a muscle. Once formed, they radiate pain out from the belly similar to a wrinkle in a sheet or a ripple on the water, this is the referred pain felt. Trigger points are produced by muscle stress, such as overwork, repetitive motion, or sudden excessive stretch.

There are four types of trigger points:

  1. Active TrP – one that is spontaneously producing referred pain.
  2. Latent TrP – one that produces pain when pressure is applied during palpation.
  3. Primary TrP – one that is caused by muscle stress.
  4. Satellite TrP – one that is produced secondarily by a primary trigger point.

How Do They Go Away?

Trigger points generally stay inside the muscle until manipulated away. Get rid of them today with medical massage therapy in Des Moines Iowa.Trigger points generally stay inside the muscle until manipulated away. In layman’s terms, when a muscle is over-stressed it feels compromised and immediately protects itself. This tightening process forms TrPs within the muscle. Muscles are very stubborn and don’t forget experiences easily, hence the term “muscle memory”. Muscles will hold on to this protection until a manual process occurs which tells the brain to send a signal to the muscle that it’s safe to relax and return to a normal resting length. This is what I do.

Pressure is placed directly into a tight or sensitive trigger point area, which often causes radiating pain, and held until the tenderness disappears. This process repeats running along the rippled path of the TrPs. There is a delicate balance between applying enough pressure to release it and applying so much pressure that the TrP worsens. Releasing the points encourages increased circulation to the area allowing the underlying tissue to soften. This is the point when clients say, “I didn’t even know that hurt until you found it! How did you know that was there?”

What Is Neuromuscular Therapy?

Neuromuscular Therapy is also called Trigger Point Myotherapy. This technique alters the length muscles to teach them how to operate correctly. Muscles are manipulated back into the shape originally intended. Less is more during this treatment session to avoid bruising and soreness. This type of therapy consists of alternating levels of concentrated pressure on the areas of muscle spasm to release the lactic acid from the muscle, resulting in increased blood flow and oxygen. Fascia is also stretched to keep the body loose. If the shell of the body is loose, the muscles can loosen and relax back into their natural form.

Causes of Trigger Points

The common cause of trigger points results from various forms of trauma, ranging from a direct injury, excessive stretching, heavy lifting and twisting, or even emotional stress. These sensitive regions will often activate pain in referring areas. Once we eliminate the trigger point, massage aids in removing the waste products and restore circulation to the area.

Some trigger points will be more severe than others and patience is the key factor during the session. Less severe TrPs will release almost immediatley. More severe ones need worked longer. The reason the experience is so worth it, however, is that there is an immediate relief as soon as the TrP dissipates. There’s no waiting 3-5 days to see if the session was a success. You know right away.

Some severe trigger points can reform after a session. I always recommend icing the area worked after a session. The ice will increase circulation to the area and decrease inflammation, minimizing the odds of the TrP reforming.

Dr. Janet Travell is the person most often associated with trigger point therapy. She’s quoted as saying, “Active trigger points cause pain. Normal muscles do not contain trigger points. Individuals of either gender and of any age can develop trigger points.” Simple enough. Another great reminder that you don’t have to live with the pain. Come in and get those stinkers gone so you can feel good in your skin again.

See you on the table!